Diversity in the workplace

Many of the high tech firms in Silicon Valley are releasing gender and racial diversity in the workplace statistics.

I say, “So what…?

What the statistics tell me is that males like to work in the high tech industry.

Do anybody really believe that companies like Apple or Google deliberately turn away qualified women (or minorities) interviewing for high tech jobs at their companies? Who specifically are the hiring managers that are doing this? Is there a corporate policy document instructing them to do this?

The notion is absurd.

These companies didn’t get to be where they are by turning away qualified applicants. The hiring managers evaluate and determine who the the most qualified applicants are and hire them.

That is, until now.

Companies like Apple are now under pressure by very small but very loud activist groups to fill open positions with less-qualified applicants, in the (ultimately irrelevant) name of “diversity”.

The California state university system does the same thing. They need to admit a certain percentage less-qualified students to fill quotas, while other students who earned their way in struggle for decades to repay out-of-state school debt.

There is one diversity-related statistic you never see however – the breakdown of jobs by age. Because we never see these numbers, it’s hard to speak accurately about them, but I think that it’s safe to say that the over-50 crowd is hugely under-represented by the high tech firms.

You never seem to hear complaints or calls for more males in the Nursing profession — or any other profession for that matter. And what about the absence of females playing Major League Baseball? There are no women playing in that sport; this should be an outrage for people striving for workplace diversity, but its not. If you want true diversity look across all the spectrum of professions. Maybe the reason people choose one profession or another is that they truly love what they do and it’s a passion. No matter what your gender, race or walk of life.

I have no desire to be a Nurse. It’s not that I think the job is beneath me, it’s simply that I know in my heart that I wouldn’t be any good at it, because its not my true passion. Sure, I could probably pass the tests (barely) to qualify, but trust me, you do not want me as your nurse. Being a nurse is not something I’d enjoy doing, and becoming one would be unpleasant for me, a struggle for my employer and a disaster for patients.